Difference between revisions of "Clopidogrel"

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[[Image:clodiprogrel02.jpg|thumb]]
 
[[Image:clodiprogrel02.jpg|thumb]]
  
Thienopyridines, such as Clopidogrel (Plavix), are anti-platelet aggregation drugs which irreversibly inhibit the binding of adenine diphosphate (ADP) to specific platelet ADP receptors, thereby inhibiting clotting. This ADP receptor blockade impairs platelet release reaction and ADP-mediated activation of GPIIb/IIIa, thereby reducing the aggregation response. Clopidogrel (Plavix; Sanofi-Aventis, Laval, Quebec), a thienopyridine, is readily available and has been evaluated in healthy cats. In comparison to aspirin and cilostazol, clopidogrel causes prolonged bleeding time in cats as does aspirin, but not cilostazol, which appears to have antithrombotic effects without altering clotting time in cats<ref>Joong-Seok Kim MDa, Kwang-Soo Lee MDa, , , Yeong-In Kim MDa, Yoshiko Tamai MDb, Reiko Nakahata MDb and Hideki Takami MD (2004) A randomized crossover comparative study of aspirin, cilostazol and clopidogrel in normal controls: analysis with quantitative bleeding time and platelet aggregation test. ''Journal of Clinical Neuroscience'' '''11(6)''':600-602</ref>.
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Thienopyridines, such as Clopidogrel (Plavix), are anti-platelet aggregation drugs which irreversibly inhibit the binding of adenine diphosphate (ADP) to specific platelet ADP receptors, thereby inhibiting clotting. This ADP receptor blockade impairs platelet release reaction and ADP-mediated activation of GPIIb/IIIa, thereby reducing the aggregation response. Clopidogrel (Plavix; Sanofi-Aventis, Laval, Quebec), a thienopyridine, is readily available and has been evaluated in healthy cats.  
  
Clopidogrel, at dosages of 18.75 - 75 mg orally every 24 hrs appear to be well tolerated in cats and results in significant anti-platelet effects<ref>Hogan DF, Andrews DA, Green HW, Talbott KK, Ward MP, Calloway BM. (2004) Antiplatelet effects and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in cats. ''J Am Vet Med Assoc'' '''225''':1406–1411</ref>. Its primary use in cats is for prevention or minimisation of recurrence of [[aortic thromboembolism]] associated with various [[heart diseases]] such as [[cardiomyopathy]] and [[mitral valve dysplasia]]. It appears limited in its capacity as a thrombolytic agent<ref>Hogan, DE & Ward, MP (2004) Effect of clopidogrel on tissue-plasminogen activator-induced in vitro thrombolysis of feline whole blood thrombi. ''Am J Vet Res''  '''65(60)''':715-719</ref>.  
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In comparison to aspirin and cilostazol, clopidogrel causes prolonged bleeding time in cats as does aspirin, but not cilostazol, which appears to have antithrombotic effects without altering clotting time in cats<ref>Joong-Seok Kim MDa, Kwang-Soo Lee MDa, , , Yeong-In Kim MDa, Yoshiko Tamai MDb, Reiko Nakahata MDb and Hideki Takami MD (2004) A randomized crossover comparative study of aspirin, cilostazol and clopidogrel in normal controls: analysis with quantitative bleeding time and platelet aggregation test. ''Journal of Clinical Neuroscience'' '''11(6)''':600-602</ref>.
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Clopidogrel, at dosages of 18.75 - 75 mg orally every 24 hrs appear to be well tolerated in cats and results in significant anti-platelet effects<ref>Hogan DF, Andrews DA, Green HW, Talbott KK, Ward MP, Calloway BM. (2004) Antiplatelet effects and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in cats. ''J Am Vet Med Assoc'' '''225''':1406–1411</ref>.  
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Its primary use in cats is for prevention or minimisation of recurrence of [[aortic thromboembolism]] associated with various [[heart diseases]] such as [[cardiomyopathy]] and [[mitral valve dysplasia]]. It appears limited in its capacity as a thrombolytic agent<ref>Hogan, DE & Ward, MP (2004) Effect of clopidogrel on tissue-plasminogen activator-induced in vitro thrombolysis of feline whole blood thrombi. ''Am J Vet Res''  '''65(60)''':715-719</ref>.  
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
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Revision as of 21:36, 29 August 2017

Figure showing platelet aggregation (PA) in 9 healthy cats before and after a 3-day clopidogrel treatment of 18.75 mg q 24 hrs
Clodiprogrel02.jpg

Thienopyridines, such as Clopidogrel (Plavix), are anti-platelet aggregation drugs which irreversibly inhibit the binding of adenine diphosphate (ADP) to specific platelet ADP receptors, thereby inhibiting clotting. This ADP receptor blockade impairs platelet release reaction and ADP-mediated activation of GPIIb/IIIa, thereby reducing the aggregation response. Clopidogrel (Plavix; Sanofi-Aventis, Laval, Quebec), a thienopyridine, is readily available and has been evaluated in healthy cats.

In comparison to aspirin and cilostazol, clopidogrel causes prolonged bleeding time in cats as does aspirin, but not cilostazol, which appears to have antithrombotic effects without altering clotting time in cats[1].

Clopidogrel, at dosages of 18.75 - 75 mg orally every 24 hrs appear to be well tolerated in cats and results in significant anti-platelet effects[2].

Its primary use in cats is for prevention or minimisation of recurrence of aortic thromboembolism associated with various heart diseases such as cardiomyopathy and mitral valve dysplasia. It appears limited in its capacity as a thrombolytic agent[3].

References

  1. Joong-Seok Kim MDa, Kwang-Soo Lee MDa, , , Yeong-In Kim MDa, Yoshiko Tamai MDb, Reiko Nakahata MDb and Hideki Takami MD (2004) A randomized crossover comparative study of aspirin, cilostazol and clopidogrel in normal controls: analysis with quantitative bleeding time and platelet aggregation test. Journal of Clinical Neuroscience 11(6):600-602
  2. Hogan DF, Andrews DA, Green HW, Talbott KK, Ward MP, Calloway BM. (2004) Antiplatelet effects and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 225:1406–1411
  3. Hogan, DE & Ward, MP (2004) Effect of clopidogrel on tissue-plasminogen activator-induced in vitro thrombolysis of feline whole blood thrombi. Am J Vet Res 65(60):715-719