Chloramphenicol

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Chloramphenicol is a broad-spectrum bacteriostat effective against certain bacteria.

It is readily available in bovine medicine as an injectable as well as an oral ointment for treatment of conjunctivitis.

Because of side effects such as anaemia due to bone-marrow suppression, it is not normally used as a first-line of choice in infectious diseases of cattle.

Chloramphenicol is widely used in treatment of mastitis, bovine respiratory disease[1] and Brucella spp-induced abortion[2].

Chloramphenicol has proven efficacy against Escherichia coli and Campylobacter spp bacteria.

Recommended dose rate is 10 mg/kg every 12 hours, orally.

References

  1. Thiry J et al (2011) Efficacy and safety of a new 450 mg/ml florfenicol formulation administered intramuscularly in the treatment of bacterial bovine respiratory disease. Vet Rec 169(20):526
  2. Heo EJ et al (2012) In vitro activities of antimicrobials against Brucella abortus isolates from cattle in Korea during 1998-2006. J Microbiol Biotechnol 22(4):567-570