Toxic epidermal necrolysis

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Toxic epidermal necrolysis - Skin showing spongiosis of the epidermis and extensive apoptotic loss of keratinocytes.

Toxic epidermal necrolysis is an autoimmune disease of cattle. Severe drug reactions are purportedly a contributory cause[1].

Clinical signs in affected cattle are characterised by full-thickness epidermal exfoliation[2].

Diagnosis is one of exclusion after ruling out underlying disease or drug administration[3]. Histopatholigcal analysis of affected tissue shows spongiosis of the epidermis and extensive apoptotic loss of keratinocytes.

Secondary bacterial infections are common.

Treatment is usually symptomatic, with topical applications of broad-spectrum antibiotic and antiinflammatory emollients. Systemic and/or topical corticosteroids and antibiotics such as Ceftiofur may minimise the severity in valuable cattle.


References

  1. Yeruham I et al (1999) Case report: idiopathic toxic epidermal necrolysis in a one-week old calf. Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr 112(5):172-173
  2. Senturk S et al (2012) Toxic epidermal necrolysis associated with Mycoplasma bovis in calves. Vet Rec 170(22):566
  3. White BJ et al (2012) Clinical, behavioral, and pulmonary changes in calves following inoculation with Mycoplasma bovis. Am J Vet Res 73(4):490-497