Difference between revisions of "Sanganer"

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[[File:Sanganer.jpg|thumb|<ref>[http://www.thecattlesite.com/breeds/beef/78/sanganer/overview Thecattlesite.com]</ref>]]
  
 
The Sanganer is a new [[breeds|breed]] created in Africa for the purpose of being a damline breed as it has been declared that there are not enough in the country. It has been created using the Africander and the Nguni both of which are indiginous breeds well suited to that environment.
 
The Sanganer is a new [[breeds|breed]] created in Africa for the purpose of being a damline breed as it has been declared that there are not enough in the country. It has been created using the Africander and the Nguni both of which are indiginous breeds well suited to that environment.
  
Since the Sanganer is still in the development phase, little information is currently available regarding this breed of cattle. The following very important attributes have already come to the fore.
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==References==
 
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<References/>
Tick resistance - Not only do these animals have a very good resistance against tick-borne diseases, but generally have less ticks than animals from other breeds.
 
 
 
Easy calving - Calving problems do not occur
 
 
 
Vitality - The calves are vigourous and the mortality rate is low.
 
 
 
Good constitution - These animals are always in very good condition. The young oxen can be marketed off grazing from the age of 15 months.
 
 
 
Fertility - This breed is early maturing. Some heifers come into estrus before they are 12 months old. The re-fertilisation of the first-calf cows is excellent.
 

Latest revision as of 01:21, 13 March 2013

The Sanganer is a new breed created in Africa for the purpose of being a damline breed as it has been declared that there are not enough in the country. It has been created using the Africander and the Nguni both of which are indiginous breeds well suited to that environment.

References