Difference between revisions of "Shetland"

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[[File:Shetland cattle.JPG|thumb|<ref>[http://www.thecattlesite.com/breeds/beef/109/shetland/overview Thecattlesite.com]</ref>]]
  
 
The Shetland is a rare [[breeds|breed]] of cattle that is currently classified as at risk by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust in the Britain. They excel in traditional roles such as smallholding and extensive grass-fed commercial beef systems, and they are eminently suitable for use in conservation grazing, a strong growth area in livestock farming. Today they are classed as dual purpose breed.  
 
The Shetland is a rare [[breeds|breed]] of cattle that is currently classified as at risk by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust in the Britain. They excel in traditional roles such as smallholding and extensive grass-fed commercial beef systems, and they are eminently suitable for use in conservation grazing, a strong growth area in livestock farming. Today they are classed as dual purpose breed.  
  
The majority of Shetlands are black and white but red and white is also now firmly established, and even whole colours are reappearing. The Shetland has delicately shaped inward and slightly upward curving horns (appropriately Viking style) but can be polled if preferred. In the winter they have a long hairy coat which starts growing in August, by May they become sleek and shiny with their summer coat, all calves are born with a woolly coat what ever time of the year they are born.
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==References==
It stands, on average, 48 inches high though the truly traditional type can be much smaller – “the most diminutive of its kind in the world”.
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<References/>

Latest revision as of 01:36, 13 March 2013

The Shetland is a rare breed of cattle that is currently classified as at risk by the Rare Breeds Survival Trust in the Britain. They excel in traditional roles such as smallholding and extensive grass-fed commercial beef systems, and they are eminently suitable for use in conservation grazing, a strong growth area in livestock farming. Today they are classed as dual purpose breed.

References