Eosinophilic granulomatous gastroenterocolitis

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Eosinophilic granulomatous gastroenterocolitis is an inflammatory bowel disease of dogs characterized by diffuse intestinal thickening and eosinophilic enteritis of the stomach, jejunum, ileum, colon.

Rarely, eosinophilic masses have been reported[1].

A breed predisposition has been noted in the Rottweiler and purebred, large breed dogs such as the French Bulldogs.

A causal link has been established between this disease and involvement of pathogenic Escherichia coli[2].

Concurrent eosinophilic granulomatous gastroenterocolitis and hepatitis have been reported in younger dogs[3].

Clinical signs include chronic intermittent anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and hematochezia.

An abdominal or rectal mass is frequently noted on physical examination.

Hematological aberrations include peripheral eosinophilia, mature neutrophilia, hypoproteinemia, and hypocholesterolemia.

Histologically, the masses are composed of moderate to severe eosinophilic infiltrates, which were often transmural and accompanied by fibrosis.

A differential diagnosis would include gastrointestinal stromal tumor, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and intestinal lymphoma.

Administration of enrofloxacin or marbofloxacin at 10 mg/kg) orally every 24 hours is associated with clinical improvement within 5 - 14 days.

In refractory cases, treatment with prednisolone and ivermectin offers palliative responses with eventual resolution of clinical signs.

Dog should not be treated surgically, as they are accompanied with a poor prognosis.

References

  1. Lyles SE et al (2009) Idiopathic eosinophilic masses of the gastrointestinal tract in dogs. J Vet Intern Med 23(4):818-823
  2. Manchester AC et al (2013) Association between granulomatous colitis in French Bulldogs and invasive Escherichia coli and response to fluoroquinolone antimicrobials. J Vet Intern Med 27(1):56-61
  3. Brellou GD et al (2006) Eosinophilic granulomatous gastroenterocolitis and hepatitis in a 1-year-old male Siberian Husky. Vet Pathol 43(6):1022-1025