Difference between revisions of "Finnish Spitz"

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The origin of the Finnish Spitz [[breeds|breed]] dates back over hundreds of years and was first used for game hunting throughout its native Finland. The first breed standard was established in 1892 and is now commonly seen throughout Finland and Sweden. The Spitz is such an essential part of the Finnish culture it was named the National Dog of Finland in 1979.
 
The origin of the Finnish Spitz [[breeds|breed]] dates back over hundreds of years and was first used for game hunting throughout its native Finland. The first breed standard was established in 1892 and is now commonly seen throughout Finland and Sweden. The Spitz is such an essential part of the Finnish culture it was named the National Dog of Finland in 1979.
  
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These happy dogs make great companions, but do require some room to play and explore. Early training will help keep this lively and enthusiastic dog in check.
 
These happy dogs make great companions, but do require some room to play and explore. Early training will help keep this lively and enthusiastic dog in check.
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==Disease predisposition==
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*[[Pemphigus foliaceus]]
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*[[Transient hypogammaglobulinaemia]]
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*[[Spitz dog thrombopathia]]
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==References==
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<References/>

Revision as of 00:15, 14 February 2013

Finnish Spitz.jpg

The origin of the Finnish Spitz breed dates back over hundreds of years and was first used for game hunting throughout its native Finland. The first breed standard was established in 1892 and is now commonly seen throughout Finland and Sweden. The Spitz is such an essential part of the Finnish culture it was named the National Dog of Finland in 1979.

The Finnish Spitz likes to keep itself clean and usually lives up to 11 years of age, but with care and the proper nutrition should live to 14 years.

This lively and independent dog will get along with just about everybody (including children) and everything (including other pets) in the house. It is bright, alert and can make an excellent guard dog.

The lively Spitz gets along well with other pets in the home especially if they are raised together from an early age.

The Finnish Spitz has a strong desire to keep itself clean and will lick any soiling from its coat or feet. Although the coat is short and close to the body, it will shed annually and will require a brush and comb to allow the new coat to grow through. It also prefers the cooler parts of the house and garden and will be content investigating these areas at its leisure.

These happy dogs make great companions, but do require some room to play and explore. Early training will help keep this lively and enthusiastic dog in check.

Disease predisposition

References