Difference between revisions of "Hungarian Vizsla"

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[[Image:Hungarian Vizsla.jpg|300px|right]]
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[[Image:Hungarian Vizsla.jpg|thumb|<ref>[http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/vizsla.htm Dog breed info]</ref>]]
  
 
The Hungarian Vizsla are a [[breeds|dog breed]] which originated in Hungary, bred by the Magyars, who used them as hunting dogs.  
 
The Hungarian Vizsla are a [[breeds|dog breed]] which originated in Hungary, bred by the Magyars, who used them as hunting dogs.  
  
Vizslas are thought to have descended from several types of pointers along with the Transylvanian hound, and the Turkish yellow dog (now extinct). "Vizsla" means "pointer" in the Hungarian language. The dogs worked as hunters, their superb noses and endless energy guided them to excel at catching upland game such as waterfowl and rabbit. The breed almost became extinct after World War II. After the war when the Russians took control of Hungary it was feared that the breed would disappear from existence. In an attempt to save the breed, native hungarians smuggled some of the dogs to American and Austria. The Vizsla has two cousins, one with hard-wire hair called the [[Hungarian Wirehaired Vizsla|Wirehaired Vizsla]] and the other a rare longhaired Vizsla. The longhaired can be born in both smooth and wire litters, although this is quite a rare occurrence. The longhaired Vizslas are not registered anywhere in the world but there are some to be found in Europe. Some of the Vizsla's talents include retriever, pointer, game bird hunter, obedience competitions, agility, and watchdog<ref>[http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/vizsla.htm Dog breed info]</ref>.
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==Disease predisposition==
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*[[Sebaceous adenitis]]
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*[[Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia]]
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*[[Entropion]]
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*[[Cataract]]
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*[[Glaucoma]]
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*[[Progressive retinal atrophy]]
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
<References/>
 
<References/>

Latest revision as of 04:57, 15 February 2013

The Hungarian Vizsla are a dog breed which originated in Hungary, bred by the Magyars, who used them as hunting dogs.

Disease predisposition

References