Difference between revisions of "Mitotane"

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(Created page with "Mitotane (Lysodren; o,p'-DDD) is an antineoplastic medication used in the treatment of canine pituitary adenoma or pituitary adenocarcinoma<ref>Reine NJ (2012) Medical...")
 
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Side-effects include drug-induced [[hypoadrenocorticism]].
 
Side-effects include drug-induced [[hypoadrenocorticism]].
  
Recommended dose rate in dogs is 50 mg/kg orally once daily for five days, then once weekly maintenance therapy.
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Recommended dose rate in dogs is 50 mg/kg orally once daily for five days, then once weekly maintenance therapy. However, as body weight increases, dose/kg or dosage/day of trilostane required to control the clinical signs of PDH decreases. Dogs weighing >30 kg might require smaller amounts of trilostane per dose or per day<ref>Feldman EC & Kass PH (2012) Trilostane dose versus body weight in the treatment of naturally occurring pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism in dogs. ''J Vet Intern Med'' '''26(4)''':1078-1080</ref>.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
<References/>
 
<References/>

Revision as of 21:03, 1 February 2013

Mitotane (Lysodren; o,p'-DDD) is an antineoplastic medication used in the treatment of canine pituitary adenoma or pituitary adenocarcinoma[1].

Mitotane is used in adrenal cancer as adjuvant therapy, monotherapy or combined with other cytotoxic agents in advanced disease.

Side-effects include drug-induced hypoadrenocorticism.

Recommended dose rate in dogs is 50 mg/kg orally once daily for five days, then once weekly maintenance therapy. However, as body weight increases, dose/kg or dosage/day of trilostane required to control the clinical signs of PDH decreases. Dogs weighing >30 kg might require smaller amounts of trilostane per dose or per day[2].

References

  1. Reine NJ (2012) Medical management of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism: mitotane versus trilostane. Top Companion Anim Med 27(1):25-30
  2. Feldman EC & Kass PH (2012) Trilostane dose versus body weight in the treatment of naturally occurring pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism in dogs. J Vet Intern Med 26(4):1078-1080