Difference between revisions of "Otobius spp"

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[[File:otobius01.jpg|thumb|''Otobius megnini'' nymph<ref>[http://www.k-state.edu/parasitology/625tutorials/Arthropods14.html Kansas State Uni]</ref>]]
''Otobius spp'' are a hematophagous [[parasites|parasitic]] spinous ear [[ticks|tick]] found in North America and Africa<ref>Matthews BR (1989) Otobius megnini (spinous ear tick) in a dog. ''Can Vet J'' '''30(2)''':180</ref><ref>Ugochukwu EI & Nnadozie CC (1985) Ectoparasitic infestation of dogs in Bendel State, Nigeria. ''Int J Zoonoses'' '''12(4)''':308-312</ref>.
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''Otobius spp'' are a hematophagous [[parasites|parasitic]] spinose ear-[[ticks|tick]] found in North America and Africa<ref>Matthews BR (1989) Otobius megnini (spinous ear tick) in a dog. ''Can Vet J'' '''30(2)''':180</ref><ref>Ugochukwu EI & Nnadozie CC (1985) Ectoparasitic infestation of dogs in Bendel State, Nigeria. ''Int J Zoonoses'' '''12(4)''':308-312</ref>.
  
 
Species which are pathogenic to dogs include:
 
Species which are pathogenic to dogs include:

Revision as of 04:55, 30 October 2012

Otobius megnini nymph[1]

Otobius spp are a hematophagous parasitic spinose ear-tick found in North America and Africa[2][3].

Species which are pathogenic to dogs include:

  • Otobius megnini[4]

Only the larvae and nymphs are parasitic. The nymphal stage appears bluish grey with four pairs of yellow legs, while the larva has three pairs. Feeding in the ear canal they can produce acute otitis externa, pain and occasionally convulsions[4].

They can remain in the canal for up to seven months before becoming free-living adults.

References

  1. Kansas State Uni
  2. Matthews BR (1989) Otobius megnini (spinous ear tick) in a dog. Can Vet J 30(2):180
  3. Ugochukwu EI & Nnadozie CC (1985) Ectoparasitic infestation of dogs in Bendel State, Nigeria. Int J Zoonoses 12(4):308-312
  4. 4.0 4.1 Horak IG & Matthee S (2003) Parasites of domestic and wild animals in South Africa. XLIII. Ixodid ticks of domestic dogs and cats in the Western Cape Province. Onderstepoort J Vet Res 70(3):187-195